Long-haul flights are brutal to your body, and jet-lag can cripple your productivity while you acclimate to your surroundings. I was practically giddy this week when I found a flight to South Africa a mere 36 hours long — 12 hours shorter than I had anticipated. After spending two or three days in transit, it typically takes me a day to feel functional again, and a week to feel normal.
Get lost. Wander down alleys. Sit in cafés and watch life pass by. Don't eat where the tourists do, but where you see locals. Just set off down a street and see where it leads. Look around the bends, over the rises. Get away from the crowd. I find that if I meander away from the tourists and tourist sites, away from what is too familiar and comfortable, it's much easier to adapt to the rhythm of a place, and to be more observant.
When you travel, saving money is often the exact same as earning. Quite often, exchanging a couple images with a hotel for a free room or a tour company for a free tour is totally worth it. In fact, when I was in Southern Africa, I did this a lot. Safaris are expensive, so I’d create a couple images for a company to use for their marketing purposes in exchange for a free safari. It really is win-win.
Knowing how to use your camera is essential to success as a travel photographer because more often than not, it’s those spur of the moment shots that generate the goods. If you can quickly adapt to the surroundings and know what settings to change in a split-second in order to capture a moment, you’re in with a pretty good shot of becoming a professional photographer.
When you arrive at your destination, be open and try to take note of the first impressions—write them down if you have to. (A notebook is an essential accessory for a travel photographer.) When you see a place for the first time from the plane window, or when you drive around a bend and there it is, or as the ship nears some distant island—how do you feel? Where do your eyes go first? What do you notice about the place right away? A smell? The heat or cold? Blistering sunlight? Mysterious fog? A particular building or vista? The way people move? Their dress? Whatever it is, remember it. First impressions are invaluable sparks to creative interpretation, and by definition are not repeatable. You've seen the place in pictures, you've read about it. Now you're there, and all your senses can partake.

The patrician-looking (and rather taciturn) sadhu in the top photograph did tell me that he had a family, had held a managerial position in the Indian Railway from which he earned a pension (now paid to his wife), but had decided to detach himself from temporal life and was currently studying the Vedas. These are the oldest scriptures of Hinduism. He was the embodiment of a real sadhu who had really espoused the Vairāgya, and was far different from the "sadhus" I encountered on the ghats of Varanasi (below) almost 8 years later.
Photographers: Travel (960) Photographers: Photojournalists (607) Photojournalism (562) India (556) Multimedia (446) Events (344) POV (241) Hard Gear (230) Festivals (178) Vietnam (151) China (150) Innovative Stuff (132) Contests (130) Photographers (123) Africa (119) TTP Show Off (110) Asia (106) Soundslides (99) Books (96) Bhutan (78) Ethiopia (75) Afghanistan (73) Bali (72) Photo Events (70) Burma (68) Egypt (62) Leica (61) Mexico (61) Beyond The Frame (51) Cambodia (51) Thailand (49) My Work (48) Soft Gear (48) Tibet (42) Pakistan (41) Audio (40) Morocco (40) Destinations (38) Bangladesh (34) Interviews (33) Malaysia (33) Indonesia (31) Photo Interviews (31) National Geographic (30) Rants (30) X-Pro 1 (30) Nepal (28) Photo Techniques (25) Haiti (23) Brazil (22) iPhone (21) Guatemala (20) Turkey (20) TTP Recap (19) Cuba (18) One Shot (17) Kashmir Photo Tours (16) Kashmir (15) NYC (15) Japan (14) Bolivia (12) Laos (12) Peru (12) New York (11) Phillippines (11) Iraq (10) Ladakh (10) Middle East (10) USA (10) Podcasts (9) Central America (8) Benin (7) Iran (7) Mali (7) Photoshop Technique (7) Spain (7) Darfur (6) Italy (6) Singapore (6) Israel (5) Lebanon (5) Lightroom (5) Pushkar Fair (5) France (4) Mongolia (4) Russia (4) Taiwan (4) Venezuela (4) Yemen (4) Dominican Republic (3) Lenses (3) Palestine (3) Sri Lanka (3) Sudan (3) Tajikistan (3) Argentina (2) Buenos Aires (2) Colombia (2) Libya (2) Mauritania (2) Ireland (1) North Korea (1) Poland (1) Portugal (1) Scotland (1) Tanzania (1)
A pretty picture is not enough. It needs to be high quality and it needs to be original. For magazines, you need to consider issues such as leaving space on the image for word placement, positioning your subject off-centre so it doesn’t fall down the page join, and possibly placing the subject on the right-hand side of a landscape shot for maximum impact.
This was a really informative article Hillary :) Just wish I found it sooner because just a week ago I went to the Grand Canyon to snap some photos. I didn't have this article to help, but I found a similarly useful article that provided some kind of checklist of things to do before traveling. If anyone's interested, here's what helped me out before I went to the canyon: http://www.adoramapix.com/blog/2016/10/16/photography-101-packing/#.WFH9...
×