I was booked for a trip out of Santa Barbara to Denver then to Chicago. I have a brain injury and had wheel chair assistant due to my injury. Our flight was delayed for 6 hours at Santa Barbara which is were my daughter lives. I was going to reschedule my flight but was given a phone number to the hotel. This with the airport assistant made me feel comfortable enough to continue my travel. At the Denver airport was when we were told there was going to be no hotel. Thank God one other person was in the same situation as I was. My assistant took me to McDonald’s for food then took me to our gate. So from 11:00 PM till our fight at 6:30Am I was left with a stranger. We slept on the floor for a few hours. I was afraid to leave for food the next morning. Needless to say I was dissatisfied with the lack of communication about no hotel. My safety wasn’t a concern of your airline. My back still hurts after two days. I hope after this review your company will take others with disabilities into consideration before making decisions that could put them in a potentially dangerous situation.
Worst airline ever!!! Had the worst experience and will never fly with them again. Although the flights are fairly cheap, it is more worth your time to spend a few extra dollars to fly with another airline. My flight was cancelled twice, then delayed another time. They gave me a 30 min notice before the cancellation and I had driven 5 hours to the airport... completely ridiculous and do not recommend.
I was a frontier fly club member for a whole year and found that their website was way to confusing to use. They would advertise a promotion but then when I clicked it and would attempt to purchase the travel itinerary it would always go up. It was disappointing. Specially because I paid a membership fee and wanted to travel. Customer service over the phone was no help. Wouldn’t do it again. Stopped flying with them over all.
^ Jump up to: a b Cuozzo, Steve. "JetBlue Triples Size of its Queens Offices." New York Post. December 24, 2002. Retrieved on January 20, 2010. "74,000 square feet at 118–29 Queens Blvd., also known as Forest Hills Tower" and "Boulevard in Forest Hills – possibly the largest office lease in Queens this year. JetBlue was previously at 80–02 Kew Gardens Rd., across the street."
What makes them so good is the fact that they genuinely strive to give their guests all kinds of luxuries and an experience of leisure travel at unbelievably affordable prices. It has all the horse power that one can imagine a complete airline to have in the form of low fares, all-jet non-stop service to almost anywhere in America, Mexico and Canada and world-class travel partners. Ever since it was certified by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as a “Scheduled Air Carrier” it has been operating as scheduled and chartered airlines much to the delight of its guests all over America.
In February 2002, the airline launched its first regional product, Frontier JetExpress, initially operated by Mesa Airlines using CRJ-200 regional jets. Similar to "express" operations of other carriers, Frontier JetExpress was targeted for markets to and from Denver that do not generate traffic sufficient to support Frontier's smallest mainline jet, the Airbus A318, but could still offer lucrative business with a smaller jet.

Scheduled service began on October 15, 1998, between Las Vegas and the airline's original hub in Fresno, California, at the Fresno Yosemite International Airport, with Douglas DC-9-21 and McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51 jetliners. During the second half of 1999, the airline was operating nonstop flights between Fresno and Las Vegas, Burbank and Lake Tahoe, and Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe as well as flying one-stop direct service between Fresno and Lake Tahoe via Las Vegas.[9] Shortly after WinAir Airlines closed in 1999, Allegiant Air opened a small hub in Long Beach, CA (LGB) and in 2000 was operating nonstop flights to Fresno and Las Vegas in addition to Fresno-Las Vegas nonstop service.[10] Later in 2000, Allegiant continued to expand and was operating the only nonstop jet service between Lake Tahoe Airport from Long Beach in addition to operating new flights into Portland, Oregon and Reno with Portland-Reno and Reno-Fresno nonstops and direct one-stop service between Portland and Fresno via Reno.[11] Citing higher fuel costs as a major factor, Allegiant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2000.[12]

In July 2013, Frontier started service from New Castle Airport near Wilmington, Delaware to five destinations,[41] which Frontier markets as Wilmington/Philadelphia. Again, this airport had no commercial service prior to Frontier's entry.[citation needed] New Castle Airport lies roughly 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia International Airport and 75 miles northeast of Baltimore–Washington International Airport.[citation needed]
The airline tends to offer lower fares, which requires strict cost control.[33] Part of the airline's lower cost structure included operation of McDonnell Douglas MD-80 jets, which the airline can purchase and refurbish for as little as $4 million.[40] While the aircraft are less fuel-efficient than newer planes, Allegiant was able to purchase used MD-80s outright for one-tenth the cost of a new Boeing 737 although Allegiant has subsequently purchased used Boeing 757-200s, Airbus A319s and Airbus A320s.[13] (The 757s were acquired for its Hawaii service while the Airbus jets were beginning to replace MD-80 aircraft). As of November 2018, however, Allegiant no longer operates any MD-80 aircraft, relying instead on an all-Airbus fleet.[50] Given the low cost of ownership, Allegiant is able to operate its aircraft less (seven flight hours per day on average versus 13 hours per day at JetBlue Airways), which helps keep labor costs lower.[13] Overall, Allegiant operates with 35 full-time workers per plane compared to more than 50 at other carriers. Allegiant schedules their crew members so that they always return to their domicile at the end of the day, thus avoiding the need for hotel rooms which can be a costly expense for airlines.[40]
On April 10, 2008, Frontier filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in reaction to the intent of its credit card processor, First Data, to withhold significant proceeds from ticket sales.[23][better source needed] First Data decided that it would withhold 100% of the carrier's proceeds from ticket sales beginning May 1.[24] According to Frontier's press release, "This change in practice would have represented a material change to our cash forecasts and business plan. Unchecked, it would have put severe restraints on Frontier's liquidity..." Its operation continued uninterrupted, though, as Chapter 11 bankruptcy protected the corporation's assets and allowed restructuring to ensure long-term viability.[citation needed] After months of losses, Frontier Airlines reported that they made their first profit during the month of November 2008, reporting US$2.9 million in net income for the month.[25]
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